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Men take greater risks when doing sports

Men take greater risks when doing sports

Men are looking for physical limits rather than womenn

When it comes to sports, men are more likely to push their physical limits than women - this is the result of the current representative study “Exercise and Health - the big TK Sports Report”, which the forsa Society for Social Research and Statistical Analysis carried out on behalf of the Techniker Krankenkasse (TK) .

According to the study, every second man (47%) pursues sporting activities "because he likes to challenge himself and enjoys pushing himself to the limit" - which applies to women only in 38% of the cases. Heiko Schulz, a qualified psychologist at TK, explains this phenomenon, above all with increased performance requirements: "What already applies in today's professional society does not stop at the leisure sector: only those who really give everything and who optimize themselves permanently are considered successful and socially recognized ". Men are often even more competitive and would rather test their limits than women.

For women, health in the foreground, on the other hand, women would be more aware of their bodies and pay more attention to their health - this is also reflected in the results of the study: Because according to the survey, the health aspect is in the foreground for 92% of women, as well good looks play a major role: almost 2/3 of the women surveyed stated that they exercised to lose weight or hooked on their weight. However, this aspect is also not unimportant for men - after all, 54% of men stated that they used the sport to prevent weight problems.

Men injured more often than women The fact that men tend to push their physical limits is not without consequences: The study found that 59% of those surveyed had injured themselves slightly, and one in five (21%) had already suffered serious injuries. In the case of women, on the other hand, this looks a little more harmless: According to the results of the “big TK sport report”, only 38% have injured themselves slightly and 15% seriously as a result of sports activities.

Women access painkillers faster Despite a higher injury rate - in the event of impairments, the study again found that women tend to use painkillers in order to be able to train again more quickly. Every fourth woman (25 percent) has taken pain medication to help them recover from sports, whereas this was only the case for every fifth man (19 percent). According to Heiko Schulz, the classic understanding of roles would still apply here: "Being sick is still considered a weakness for many men. But those who take medication are sick. Men are often lone warriors. They think: I can do it on my own, I don't need any help Behind
the idea is often to be strong and invulnerable. "

So another result of the study is not surprising: With a minor injury, 22 percent of men continue to train without support from pain medication (22 percent) as women (11 percent). In September and October 2012, 1,009 German-speaking people aged 18 and over were asked about the topic "Sport and Health" for the population-representative survey. (sb)

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Video: Why Are Kids at Greater Risk of Sports Concussion than Adults? (September 2020).