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New case of bovine tuberculosis in the Allgäu

New case of bovine tuberculosis in the Allgäu

74 other animals killed for cattle TBC

Bovine tuberculosis (cattle TBC) is spreading in the Allgäu. Infected animals have already been reported in 21 farms in the Oberallgäu district. A total of 74 animals showed a positive TBC test result. The affected cattle were killed. Cattle TBC is transferable to humans.

Screening for cattle TBC As the Landratsamt Sonthofen announced on Wednesday, none of the sick animals showed any external symptoms. According to press spokesman Andreas Kaenders, the farms concerned will be closed for 16 weeks. During this time they are not allowed to sell cattle or untreated milk. It is not yet possible to determine how the animals were infected. It is possible that the cattle were infected with red deer, since some animals had spent the summer on an alp.

After the first cases of cattle TBC occurred last autumn, the district office had ordered a screening of all cattle herds. So far, however, only 145 farms from a total of almost 2,000 farms have been examined.
Germany has been officially free of cattle TBC since 1997. Nevertheless, isolated cases occur every year. This led to infections in eight animals in four farms in the Lower Allgäu region of Mindelheim. The affected cattle were killed.

Austria is also affected by cattle TBC. The infection occurred in the Zillertal at the end of December, where 65 cattle and ten goats were killed by the authorities.

Cattle TBC transferable to humans Cattle TBC is a notifiable animal disease in Germany, the control of which is regulated by law. There is a ban on vaccination and healing. The pathogen belongs to the mycobacteria and is transferable to humans. Infection is usually caused by droplet infection or contaminated drinking water and feed. Particularly vulnerable are people with a weakened immune system, such as the elderly and the chronically ill. (sb)

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New cattle disease is spreading to people

Image: Erika Hartmann / pixelio.de

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