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Handbags: More germs than on toilet seats

Handbags: More germs than on toilet seats

High levels of germs in handbags

Women's handbags contain far more bacteria and pathogenic germs than toilet seats, as a representative study by the hygiene service provider “Initial Hygiene” found. According to the researchers, leather handbags are particularly affected because the rough surfaces offer bacteria ideal opportunities for spreading. One "out of five bags were even so heavily contaminated that harmful effects could not be ruled out," the researchers write in their study report.

Many germs on hand cream The main cause of the germ contamination are contained objects such as hand cream. There is often more bacterial contamination on the surface of the packaging than on toilet seats, as the authors of the study report. "Lipstick and mascara also turned out to be little better," writes the Daily Mail magazine. Peter Barratt, technical director of "Initial Hygiene" said: "Handbags regularly come into contact with our hands and a variety of surfaces, so the risk of different germs being transferred to them is very high." . Another reason is the lack of hygiene. Handbags are often not washed at all or only very rarely.

Clean your bags more often To avoid higher bacterial loads, the experts advise you to wash your handbags more often. “After rummaging in your pocket, you should also wash your hands if possible,” the authors advise. The study has shown that the bacterial contamination is much larger than with toilet seats. Therefore, there is reason enough to place greater emphasis on hygiene when using handbags.
Coliform germs in particular settle in bags or other household items. With excessive intake, these cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea or nausea and vomiting. Moderate but regular hand washing and the occasional cleaning of the bags are the best protection. (sb)

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Bacteria in handbags like on toilet seats

Image: RainerSturm / pixelio.de

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Video: Handbags have more germs than toilet seats, study finds (September 2020).