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Is the measles vaccination coming for staff?

Is the measles vaccination coming for staff?

Measles vaccination recommended for medical personnel
30.06.2013

Everyone is talking about measles again, as there have been many new cases in recent months. A recent case shows that doctors who are not vaccinated can infect their patients. In an interview with the news magazine "Focus", an expert recommends that doctors have to be vaccinated.

Ten-month-old girl infected Germany is currently suffering from a measles epidemic. Especially in Bavaria and Berlin, the viral infection is rampant and not only children can get sick. As a recent case shows, it is sometimes doctors who are not vaccinated who transmit the disease to their patients. In a large Berlin hospital, for example, a doctor with measles had treated a ten-month-old girl with heart problems, who subsequently contracted measles herself.

Vaccination requirement "desirable" Due to the significantly increased number of measles diseases in the past few months, a debate about targeted vaccination campaigns was stimulated. Pediatrician Martin Terhardt, a member of the nationwide Standing Vaccination Commission, declared in the new issue of "Focus" that vaccination requirements for medical personnel are "desirable."

Years 1970 and later often lack adequate protection Even though the infectious disease primarily affects children, the current raging measles epidemic focuses on adults. Many of those born after 1970 have no or only incomplete vaccination protection. Measles vaccinations began in 1970 and people who were born before were often naturally protected by surviving infection. Martin Lang, Chairman of the Bavarian Professional Association of Pediatricians, said: "But 50 percent of 19 to 39 year olds are not vaccinated enough today." From this age group, 20 to 30 percent would have none and the rest only one of them two necessary vaccinations.

Currently 984 measles cases In "Focus", the specialist physician Terhardt speaks of a "generation of those who forget and do not know". The disease is often much more severe in adults than in children. A case in North Rhine-Westphalia recently showed how important vaccination is. There, a 14-year-old had died of the long-term consequences of measles. At the age of five months, he had contracted the virus in a pediatrician's waiting room. At this point the child was too young to be vaccinated. According to a "Focus" survey in all ministries of health, the number of measles cases in Germany is currently 984. With the exception of 2006 (2307 cases) and 2011 (1608 cases), this is already more than the respective sum of all illnesses in the years since 2004. (ad)

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Video: Measles outbreak sparks fears, renews tensions over mandatory vaccination (September 2020).