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Nitrogen and magnesium only in moderation

Nitrogen and magnesium only in moderation

Too much nitrogen and magnesium in the soil is harmful to plants
03.07.2013

Like humans, plants need nutrients such as nitrogen, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, sulfur and iron to survive. However, it also depends on the right ratio. Too much nitrogen and magnesium damage plants, as the Federal Environment Agency (UBA) and the Federal Soil Association inform.

Nitrogen and magnesium in the soil influence the development of plants Nutrients are vital for plants. However, only a certain amount of vegetation can be absorbed from the soil. Too many nutrients in the soil either lead to malnutrition of the plant or are washed out into the groundwater or into the rivers, where they contribute to contamination of the drinking water. Above all, too much nitrogen, phosphorus and sodium can have a negative impact on human health. The Federal Environment Agency (UBA) and the Federal Soil Association provide information on which nutrients plants need.

Nitrogen is therefore important for the development of plants. Too much of it in the ground, like chocolate in humans, means that the plants grow too tall and too wide and, at the same time, are too weak. For example, trees that had taken up too much nitrogen from the air were observed to grow "to death".

Too much magnesium also has an adverse effect on plant growth. The nutrient is important for the formation of chlorophyll and thus for photosynthesis. Iron is also involved in the formation of the natural green pigment in leaves, as the Federal Environment Agency and the Federal Soil Association inform.

Zinc also influences plant growth. Phosphorus plays an important role in flower formation and the development of the fruit set. Potassium is primarily responsible for the cell strength and the resistance of the plants. Sulfur and calcium are also responsible for the (overall) metabolism. (ag)

Image: Didi01 / pixelio.de

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