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Avian influenza deaths continue in China

Avian influenza deaths continue in China

The number of bird flu deaths continues to rise

The number of bird flu infections in China is continuously increasing. The Chinese news agency "Xinhua" reports three new bird flu deaths, which has increased the number of fatal infections with the H7N9 virus to a total of 26 since the beginning of the year. However, the deaths are only the tip of the iceberg. In total, well over 100 new infections have been registered since the beginning of the year and the health authorities warn of a further increase in the course of the Chinese New Year.

In the southern Chinese province of Guangdong, a 76-year-old man from Yangjiang City and a 52-year-old man from Huizhou City have died as a result of infection with the H7N9 avian influenza virus, according to the National Health Office. In east China's Jiangsu Province, a patient also died early Saturday morning from an H7N9 infection, reports the Xinhua News Agency. The World Health Organization also provides information on the latest bird flu infections and warns travelers about staying in poultry farms, bird markets, entering areas where poultry is slaughtered and contacting surfaces contaminated with poultry droppings. The particularly feared interpersonal transmission of the H7N9 virus is currently not yet available, but the experts have been warning for months about possible mutations of the virus, which in the worst case could be passed on from person to person.

Avian flu infections expected to increase further In the coming weeks, the number of avian influenza infections and deaths may increase dramatically again as millions of people and poultry travel across the country, health officials warn. The population is urged to seek medical attention immediately when they experience possible bird flu symptoms such as fever, cough or sore throat. (fp)

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Video: China reports rising number of human bird flu infections (October 2020).